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Khoresht e Bademjan

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This is one of my favorite Persian foods, it’s a pretty broad statement really, because I can say the same thing about so many different Persian recipes but this is one I probably make more than any other, it’s so simple and tasty and although I made it with lamb it can easily be meatless using just the eggplant and it is just as delicious. I will be honest, posting a recipe for Persian Food makes me a bit nervous, mainly because there are some incredibly awesome Persian cooks who follow this blog, Fae and Azita as an example,  I often misspell the names of the dishes and am always insecure about my method or recipe. I did learn to cook Persian food from a friend of mine from Iran,  I also have found that like so many other countries, the recipes and ingredients and methods can vary depending on what city or region you are from.

That said this is my way of making this delicious stew or Khoresht. What really gives it the distinct flavor IMHO is the dried Persian limes. You can add lemon but using the dried limes give the stews a distinct flavor that you cannot replicate using any other ingredient.  I like to serve this with rice made the Persian way see recipe here and yogurt with cucumber, mint and lemon juice.

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Khoresht e Bademjan

Serves 6 depending on serving size

2 lbs lamb stew meat

1 onion chopped

1/4 tsp turmeric

1 onion diced

1 6 oz can tomato paste

2 dried Persian Limes or juice of one lemon

approximately 3 cups water(enough water to cover the meat, eyeball it)

4 small Italian eggplant or 1 regular eggplant peeled (if you like) and cut into rounds.

salt and pepper to taste
Chop the onion, If you can find the dried limes poke holes with the tip of a knife (2-3 slits or holes)
Heat vegetable oil in large saucepan or dutch oven, add chopped onion cook until translucent, add the turmeric. Cook lamb meat until browned. Remove from pan and add the can of tomato paste and cook until paste starts to caramelize approximately 2 minutes. Add lamb back into saucepan, season with  salt and pepper, add the water and the dried limes or lemon juice.
Cook on medium heat for approximately 60-90 minutes or until the meat is fork tender and the.Sauce has thickened While the stew is cooking prepare the eggplant, Slice your eggplant into approximately 1/4 inch thick slices, salt and let sit on paper towels for approximately 30 minutes you will see the eggplant start to sweat.Rinse, pat dry and fry in oil until browned, set on paper towel to soak up some of the excess oil. Alternately you can bypass the frying and roast in the oven, lay eggplant slices on parchment, brush each side with olive oil and bake in 375 degree oven for approximately 30 minutes. After 15 minutes turn each over they should be nicely browned and roast for another 15 minutes.
When stew is done add the eggplant and cook on low for another 15 minutes. Remove from heat.

Khoresht e bademjan,saffron rice,yogurt.cucumber,mint salad

Khoresht e bademjan,saffron rice,yogurt.cucumber,mint salad

 

91 Comments Post a comment
  1. This is so flavorful Suzanne! I am sure I can try it without lamb meat!!

    January 7, 2016
    • I often make without lamb adding roasted potatoes and chick peas. Thanks Sonal!

      January 7, 2016
      • That sounds more inviting to me Suzanne!
        I am bookmarking it!

        January 7, 2016
  2. Yumm! Looks very appetising..I’m really interested in different cuisines so this ws a helpful post ☺

    January 7, 2016
  3. Hi Suzanne, I myself am far from an authority on any Persian dish but this sounds heavenly. Didn’t you make this New Years Day? I have cooked with dried limes, love Lamb, so its a win-win! Wonderful…

    January 7, 2016
    • Yes, I did am just getting around to posting now. It’s delicious. Thanks Cheryl!!

      January 7, 2016
  4. Suzanne, I’m proud of you for posting this recipes. This dish reminds me of all the excotic dishes I had and saw when I was in Morocco last year. Where did you get the dried limes? I love Fae’s blog.

    January 7, 2016
    • Thanks Gerlinde, I got the lines on Amazon marketplace they have a great international food shop!! It’s a wonderful dish. Thank you so much!!

      January 7, 2016
    • Thank you, Gerlinde for the kind comment. I love your blog too. 🙂

      January 7, 2016
  5. Wow, this is one gorgeous dish! I’m very intrigued by the dried lime. I was just with a friend last night talking about a Persian dish that she loved. I’ve never made one, and I refuse to pronounce the name of yours! I love seeing the flavor profile of what a Persian dish includes.

    January 7, 2016
    • Persian food is ultra simple, not spicy or complicated a simple melding of natural flavors. It is one of my favorite cuisines. Thanks Julie.

      January 7, 2016
  6. This looks so tempting in the photo I can practically taste it. I so love the spices used in Persian cooking – not too hot but incredibly fragrant. I imagine the dried lime adds a wonderful dimension. I love the way you’ve served it too. Just gorgeous!

    January 7, 2016
    • It’s a wonderful dish and one I make over and over. Simple and totally comfort food. Thank you so much!!

      January 7, 2016
  7. It looks good. I love exploring different cuisines from around the world. Thanks for sharing.

    January 7, 2016
    • Thanks Michelle, would be interested to hear what wine you would pair with this. I have problems with pairing wine with Middle Eastern and Asian foods.

      January 7, 2016
      • It can certainly be tricky. I would have to taste it to understand how the flavors blend. Since it is lamb I am thinking red but depending on flavors and spice it may be better with a crisp white like Riesling, Gruner Vetliner or Assyrtiko.

        January 7, 2016
      • I know because of the lamb I think red but wondered about a white thanks I will try that I think it will be good.

        January 7, 2016
  8. Mouthwatering! 🙂
    I totally agree about the dried limes.They make all the difference.

    January 7, 2016
    • Thanks so much Ronit, yes those little limes make a world of difference.

      January 7, 2016
  9. I’ll be nervous about Fae’s judgment too if I ever post anything Persian, although I’m sure she’d be very nice 🙂 This looks delicious, so I have to see if I can find dried limes. Had never heard of those before!

    January 7, 2016
    • Fae is always gracious and kind and would never say anything to discourage. Truth be told I don’t mind if someone gives me constructive critisism or tips. It’s how I learn. Thank you Stefan, I get my limes from Amazon, I order multiple bags so I always have on hand.

      January 7, 2016
    • Stefan, Please don’t ever be nervous about posting any Persian dishes. As I told Suzanne, when I see someone post Persian dishes, my heart dances. Stefan, please give a Persian dish a try. Please? 🙂

      January 7, 2016
      • I will, and it will definitely be one from your blog!

        January 8, 2016
  10. Hmmmmm…..Never used dried limes. Will need to venture there…

    January 7, 2016
    • They are terrific in Persian or Middle Eastern foods. Give a great very distinct flavor. Thank you so much Serena.

      January 7, 2016
  11. Okay Suzanne, I don’t know what you just said. (‘Gesundheit’?) But it looks mouth-watering delicious! I’m intrigued by the dried limes… love citrus.
    Have a thriving Thursday my friend. Huge hugs!

    January 7, 2016
    • LOL, I can barely pronounce myself and thats another story, I like to call it lamb and eggplant stew. You have a gorgeous Thursday as well my friend.

      January 7, 2016
  12. This is simply beautiful… comfort food just perfect for winter! Thanks for including link for the rice (my favorite bits are the crunchy pieces). Delicious meal all around!

    January 7, 2016
    • I love the crunchy bits. One thing I have not mastered is getting the crunchy rice at the bottom of paella. Maybe I need a different pan. Love the crunchy bits too!!

      January 7, 2016
  13. I’m in double awe: for your courage – I would be nervous too although Fae and Azita are among the kindest people on earth – and for the deliciousness of your stew. So perfect and yummy for the season! 😉

    January 7, 2016
    • It’s nerve wracking simply because I am in the presence of the masters. They will both of course be gracious and kind, I know that and I am posting this while Azita is away and has limited internet access so she may miss this. Thank you so much Francesca. Whether or not I did it the right way it turned out delicious.

      January 7, 2016
    • Francesca, I appreciate the kind words. I learn so much from Suzanne’s recipe methods, including the Persian dishes. Suzanne comprehends Persian flavor fusion. 🙂

      January 7, 2016
  14. Oh my gosh, I have never had this but wow sounds amazing! So special of you to share!

    January 7, 2016
  15. It looks amazing, Suzanne! I love Persian food, and like you I always feel I need to learn more. Much more… Your dish sounds so doable, though, perhaps I should just try it? 😉

    January 7, 2016
    • I used to have quite a diverse repertoire of Persian dishes, I have forgotten some and I always love to see what Fae posts because she has made some of the dishes that I forgot I could make and now I have recipes. I want to learn how to make Torshi, a Persian pickle, it’s so good Thanks so much.

      January 7, 2016
      • I really have to check it out – there’s a time and place for trying out new stuff and that time and place is here and now 😉

        January 8, 2016
      • It’s wonderful hope you try it!!

        January 8, 2016
  16. Really would like to try this without the lamb as I have a pack of dried limes that aren’t even opened. I seem to have a real problem with frying aubergine (eggplant) though. The last time was fairly recently and they wouldn’t soften! Maybe I sliced them too thick. Might have to try this over the weekend. Would a beet salad go with this?

    January 7, 2016
    • I make this all the time without meat, I add roasted potato and sometimes chick peas with the eggplant. I roast the eggplant in the oven, give it a good drizzle of olive oil and bake for about 30 minutes. I get the Italian eggplant which get nice and soft in the oven. Yes a beet salad would be lovely with it. Thank you.

      January 7, 2016
  17. Hearing about this dish for the first time. Looks so good, Suzanne! Perfect with rice and yogurt 🙂

    January 7, 2016
    • Thanks so much Freda, it is a delicious dish. I am partial to anything that can be eaten with rice.

      January 8, 2016
  18. I have never heard of this dish OR dried limes! The flavors must be amazing. I’d probably have to sub some chickpeas or potatoes for the eggplant, as my fam doesn’t tolerate it. It looks so comforting!

    January 7, 2016
    • Potatoes and chickpeas are great I sub those for the meat sometimes. Thank you so much!!

      January 7, 2016
  19. Affarin/Bravo, Suzanne! It shows that your Iranian friend was a good cook. You have presented a very important cooking technique… which is that you caramelize the tomato paste. It makes a substantial difference in the flavor. You are absolutely right about using of the dried Persian limes (limu omani), which adds a characteristic flavor of its own. Verjuice is another good suggestion to substitute the dried limes. Contrary to your concerns, whenever you post Persian dishes, you make my heart dance. Your khoresh’e bademjan looks very delectable with an excellent consistency of its sauce. Like your western dishes, your Persian dishes are also of outstanding quality. Thank you for the mention, and I will respond/appreciate the kind comments about me on this trail of comments. ❤

    January 7, 2016
    • Oh Far thank you so much. You are so kind and I appreciate your tips and suggestions and I can’t tell you how much it means to me to get a stamp of approval from you. I never thought of using verjuice instead of dried limes. It is one of my favorite of the Persian stews. Thank you again you made me so happy!!

      January 7, 2016
  20. I love this!! So much!! I forgot all about my dried limes, it’s time for some Persian stew, I think. I’m going to use some beef chuck instead. They were on sale and I bought like a gazillion, partly because that week I saw your boeuf bourguignon. See what you made me do?! 😀 😀

    January 7, 2016
    • It’s great with beef as a matter of fact I made it with beef short ribs and entered in whole foods contest and won. It was so good!!

      January 7, 2016
      • OMG, that’s even better than beef chuck! This is suitable for crockpot, you think? Sometimes I’m not too crazy about crockpot results, preferring slow oven cooking but it’s so convenient!

        January 7, 2016
      • It screams crock pot, yes it would be perfect!!!

        January 7, 2016
      • Thanks! Def this weekend I’m making this! XOXO

        January 7, 2016
  21. This sounds amazing, Suzanne. I have never cooked with dried limes and now you have inspired me to try this very exotic ingredient! Yum! 😀

    January 8, 2016
    • They add such a distinct flavor and are used in many Persian dishes. Thank you so much!

      January 8, 2016
  22. I’m sure I put wight on just reading your posts Suzanne.If you did more using sprouts I’d be safe.
    xxx Huge Hugs as always xxx

    January 8, 2016
    • Ok David I will make a salad just for you!

      January 8, 2016
      • Oh no, far too healthy !!!!!
        xxx Massive Hugs xxx

        January 8, 2016
      • LOL, ok but you could have chips with curry with the salad, best of both worlds.

        January 8, 2016
  23. Beautiful!! Looks really flavorful and interesting!

    January 8, 2016
  24. Where did you get those limes and how do you store them??? I’m fascinated!

    January 8, 2016
    • I got them on Amazon and they keep forever. They are dried and come in plastic bags. I bought 6 bags and have had them for 3 years and they are just like the day they arrived.

      January 8, 2016
      • Fantastic! Thank you!!!

        January 8, 2016
  25. I was going to ask the exact same question about the limes, but now I know… Amazon! This sounds quite delicious Suzanne. One of my goals this year is to branch out and try some new types of cuisine for weekday meals. This is wonderful inspiration 🙂

    January 8, 2016
  26. Love love love! I’m Persian or Iraian! And this is one of my favorites!!! Yum!!

    January 8, 2016
    • Oh wow now I am nervous. I love the food from Iran and just hope I did it justice. Thank you so much.

      January 8, 2016
  27. I don’t know much about Persian food but these combined foods look so inviting & fabuliscious too! Mmmmmmmmmmmmm!.

    January 8, 2016
    • I love Persian food, simple, delicious fresh everything I love and I happen to be a big fan of rice and bread and that’s eaten with just about every meal. Thanks so much.

      January 8, 2016
  28. This sounds like a really special meal. I would love to try it 🙂

    January 10, 2016
  29. Hie Suzanne– this looks like such a flavorful, warm meal for a winter evening! And I know what you mean about being a little apprehensive about putting out Persian recipes with so many good Persian cooks coming on to read! I would never cook Chinese for my daughter-in-law from China! I would be sure to disappoint her! hahaha

    January 10, 2016
    • It’s scary for sure especially since there are so many great Persian cooks around. It is good though and even if not 100% authentic it’s darn close and it tastes really good. Thanks so much Rhonda I know what you mean it would be scary cooking for someone like your daughter in law who is an expert.

      January 10, 2016
  30. This looks incredibly flavorful, Suzanne. I’ve never worked with dried limes and now I’m very intrigued!

    January 10, 2016
    • Dried limes are fantastic I haven’t used them in foods other than Persian but need to investigate that. Thank you so much!

      January 10, 2016
  31. You know a few years ago I had to visit Iran for work (tremendous experience). Oh my goodness, the food was amazing, so perfectly fragranced and spiced. It was all so perfect that I’ve never been bold enough to try making Persian food myself, so kudos to you. I should overcome this and try cooking it too. xx

    January 10, 2016
    • PS no idea where I would get those limes…

      January 10, 2016
    • One thing about Persian food is that it is not overly spiced at all, as a matter of fact it is almost the opposite. The flavors of the individual ingredients and their freshness shines in the food of Iran. There are some spices the Persian mix of Advieh (not sure I spelled correctly), turmeric, saffron of course and the Persian limes. but the spicing does not mask the flavor of the stars of the show which are the main ingredients, they only boost a little. This is why I love Persian food, it is absolutely balanced. Oh, I get the dried limes from Amazon.
      Thanks Sofia.

      January 10, 2016
      • Yes thats why, the flavour were absolutely perfect! Oh Amazon… hehe

        January 10, 2016
      • I know right they have anything you want, well almost.,,

        January 10, 2016
  32. Love the flavors in there, lovely spread Suzanne. … 🙂 🙂

    January 11, 2016
  33. What a beautiful meal, Suzanne! I love Persian food, too. When I lived in LA I ate at so many good Persian restaurants. I’ve made some Persian dishes (no restaurants here!) and will have to pick up dried limes the next time I’m back in the city. Thank you for the inspiration!

    January 15, 2016
    • There is quite a large Iranian population in LA I heard so I imagine there are some great restaurants. I always keep those dried limes in the pantry, they last forever and add so much flavor. Thanks so much.

      January 15, 2016
  34. This is one of my absolute favorites and you have done an amazing job :).

    May 5, 2016

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